What was life like in 1990’s Britain ?

What was life like in 1990’s Britain ?

After the excess and power dressing of Thatcher’s 80’s, we were catapulted into the 90’s with all the that the increased personal tech had to offer. We had personal computers, windows operating systems and were thrown into the third dimension and cyberworld of what was the internet. We watched Speed, Pretty Woman, Jurassic Park. Then, as Hanibal Lecter drank a nice chianti and ate fava beans, the theme of space continued unabated with Toystory and Toystory 2 as every little boy dreamed of being Buzz Lightyear. We explore what was life like in 1990’s Britain.

Alongside some of the usual suspects, we were clueless and having the time of our lives Dirty Dancing. As Tony Blair tripped the light fantastic into no 10 we all believed that things will never get better. We freed Kuwait and invadBritish Brit Pop in the 1990'sed Iraq and were serenaded by Whitney singing she would always love us. It was an age of excitement, possibility and chaos with recession in the early 90’s and the tech bubble exploding. As we all dreamed of joining tech giants like Apple and Windows and rebelled with Linux servers, we sang Wonderwall and heard a bittersweet symphony ring in our ears as Clinton visited at Christmas and brought with him peace in Northern Ireland.

With house music and acid House, the decade blurred through a haze of moral panics and e tabs mixed with the usual excess of teen alcohol. We sent UN troops to Bosnia and former Yugoslavia, watcAthena Posters from the 1990'shed in horror as Romanian orphanages emerged from Ceacesscius clutches as the cold war warmed up.

We decorated our bedrooms with Athena posters and coca cola signs and adorned our homes with a mixture of metal wall signs and metal wall art of times gone by. Nostalgia of more innocent times abounded as we were catapulted tumbling into an ever connected cyberworld. We learned Howstuffworks and let our 80’s mullet perms relax and grow out as we tried to iron our curls out.

We took our lead from first couple Homer and Marge Simpson and wished we were in the Central Perk with our Friends. No one told us life was gonna be this way, but it was definitely fast and furious. As the decade and century came to a close, we had mourned a people’s princess who became an icon of modernity, played trivial pursuit and ate doritos and bagels just like our friends. We watched again as the Titanic sank along with Leonardo di Caprio who managed to resurrect himself once more as the Man In The Iron Mask. Meanwhile Nelson Mandela was freed after 25 years and Apartheid finally came to an end in South Africa.

In an era of self-reflection, we railed against technology and some of us even joined in as ecowarrier Swampy and established a community of like-minded ecowarriors to live in the trees to stop the march of motorways. It was a decade of the cd rom, as Encarta killed our home tomes of the encyclopaedia Britannica. We upgraded our desktops to laptops, fought Mobile Phone from the 1990's the battle of Windows with the Apple Mac and phoned and text messaged each other incessantly with smiley faces on our ever shrinking phones. As we stood perched on the precipice of a new decade and century, Billy Joel reminded us that we didn’t start the fire. One thing is for sure though, we’ve certainly kept it burning ever since!

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1990’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in 1990’s Britain, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this wonderful decade. Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.

What was life like in 1980’s Britain ?

What was life like in 1980’s Britain ?

1980’s Britain heralded the age of computer technology. Building on a history of space travel in the 70’s when we sent a man to the moon, the 80’s began in a confident and pioneering spirit. We weren’t constricted by the mere shackles of our terrestrial planet; we were only limited by the bounds of our imagination. So, the possibility of extra-terrestrials and encounters of a third kind were something that we were all secretly looking out for. We explore what life was like in 1980’s Britain in more detail :

Pushing the boundaries of space and time, was the inimitable mad scientist Doc, who, looking suspiciously like Albert Einstein, was intent on taking Marty McFly back to the future in a futuristic gull wing De Lorean car which was made in Back to the FutureBelfast. Strange times indeed where the impossible seemed possible and there was an air of hope and optimism.

Perhaps the rose-tinted glasses of hindsight colours our memory of a decade and helps us to forget such events as Chernobyl in 1986, and the explosion of the Challenger Shuttle in the same year. We prefer to remember our favourite things like the Kids from Fame, Dynasty, Dallas, shoulder pads and power dressing.

With the launch of MTV in 1981 and music videos dominating our Top of the Pops, music was a huge influence on the decade with Run DMC’s Walk This Way being just one of the soundtracks that was blasted on our Ghetto Blasters and Walkman’s. Our sad goodbye to John Lennon and heralded the end of innocence and the age of peace and love in 1981.

However despite this, we were all glued to the love story of the century in the early 1980’s when we saw Charles and Diana’s royal love story unfold and culminate in the ultimate fairy-tale princess wedding of the century complete with princess wedding dress and golden carriage.

The 1980’s vintage toys that we played with were barbie dolls and Action Men and techno toys like Simon Says and Nintendo games consoles. We lounged in our shell suits and permed and coloured our hair using used afro combs to tease our mullets into shape and watched glued, as Charlene and Scott from sunny Neighbours fell in love and got married.

The 1980’s was definitely the era of technology when the Apple home computers and Sinclair computers Zx Spectrum Computer from the 1980'swere on everyone’s Santa list. The first mobile phone bricks were spotted in films and were to provide a hint of our future connectedness. Sci-Fi films such as Alien were popular fodder for the masses and the popularity of Star Wars and sci fi such as Dr Who and Star Trek continued unabated.

The hunger for space travel fed into the zeitgeist with the launch of the Russian Space Station the Mir where astronauts were able for the first time, to live and work in space. Meanwhile, those who had time and were lucky enough to have the chance, were playing video arcade games like Pacman and Asteroids on their televisions and home computers.

In 1987 in a remarkable thaw of east-west relations between Reagan and Gorbachev, President Reagan challenged the Russian leader to “tear down the wall”. Two years later, the uprising German citizens on either side of the wall did it for him watched by an incredulous international audience who were critically aware of the significance of the act.

Teenage mutant ninja turtles who lived underground crept into our Santa sacks in the form of cuddly toys and we all fell in love with Donatello, Raphael, Michelangelo. We all looked west to the U.S and the Bratpack for our diet of scary movies such as Halloween and a Nightmare on Elm Street and then there were the coming of age films like St Elmo’s Fire, Pretty in Pink and Footloose to1980's Retro Sweets uplift us and make us feel like we could take on the world.

We chomped our way through a lot of 1980’s retro sweets like refresher chews, space dust popping candy, everlasting gobstoppers, sherbet spaceships, fizz bombs and several quarters of bon bons and brandy balls, whilst we chanted the theme tune to Ghostbusters and played with green ectoplasm. Meanwhile, irreplaceable memories were captured instantly on our polaroid cameras.

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1980’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in 1980’s Britain, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this wonderful decade. Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.

UV Protection of Metal Wall Signs for use outside

How to protect your Metal Wall Sign for use outside.

Last Update : 28.05.19

At Sweet and Nostalgic we want you to get the most out of your Metal Wall Signs, and enjoy them for years to come. Our Metal Wall Sign range is one of our most popular product lines. Their vibrant colours add an extra special feel to your decor. We are currently running an ongoing blog to test the best UV spray products available to keep your sign in tip top condition for years to come.

This blog will be updated periodically as we run our test. The signs displayed will have been half treated (vertically) with UV Spray and the other half non-treated. We hope that you find it interesting, and we will use our results to offer products to help you get the most out of our wonderful products.

We are using 2 great Garden Wall Art Signs for this test, our Allotment Sign and our Catalogue of Seeds sign. Both are sized 30cm x 40cm.
Hanging Metal Wall Signs Oustide

 

 

 

 

We have 2 UV sprays to carry out our test.
1. Rust-Oleum Crystal Clear (Matt Finish)
2. PlastiKote Clear Sealer (Satin Finish)

UV Spray for Metal Wall Signs       UV Spray for Metal Wall Signs

Both were purchased on Amazon circa £7 per Can. Other finishes are available depending on preferred final effect.

If you intend to use a UV Spray, please make sure you fully read the instructions on the reverse of the can. Only use the spray in a well ventilated area (preferably outside). Use gloves and a face mask for additional protection.

Each sign was separated vertically using tape and cardboard. The left hand side was be treated with the UV Spray, whilst the right hand side untreated. We hope that over time we will be able to show the effect of protecting your wall sign outside, compared to not protecting it.

Each sign received 3 light coats of UV Spray over a 3 hour period (any visible markings on the vertical plane is the effect of the joint on the spray.

Protecting your Metals Wall Sign from UV Sunlight

Protecting your Metals Wall Sign from UV Sunlight

Once dried overnight the signs were erected on a south facing fence. The sun during the summer months the Sun passes by this area from 11.00am in the morning until Mid Afternoon 5.00pm. This position will expose the signs to UV light for most of the day, so this is the most extreme test of our Metal Wall Signs outside.

If your signs are in a shaded area then the effect of UV light on your Metal Sign will be considerably less.

The signs were erected on 30.05.19. We will provide updates over time to show how our Wall Signs perform.
Wall Art outside

Garden Wall Art for OutdoorsGarden Wall Art for Outdoors

To be continued. Please check back regularly for updates..

 

 

What was life like in 1970’s Britain ?

What was life like in 1970’s Britain ?

British culture from the 1970'sThis was a decade of disruption which started with the monetary change from pounds, shillings and pence to decimalisation which was a huge challenge for everyone. Strikes were rife, the three-day week was launched in 1972 to save on electricity. The country entered the Common Market after an overwhelming ‘Yes’ vote. The Arab-Israeli war in 1973 caused a shortage of oil and as a result petrol prices soared, inflation reached 26% by 1975. A drought in 1976 resulted in a severe water shortage and water restrictions were implemented. The decade of strikes culminated in the winter of discontent when ITV was off the air for five months. Read more below to find out what life was like in 1970’s Britain :

Pop-music influenced fashion first with glam rock and then punks who wanted to shock with their cropped hair and sculptured, coloured hair. At the end of the decade skinhead culture emerged with crew cuts and ‘bovver’ boots. Men and women wore flared trousers and platform shoes. On one end of the scale were hot pants and the other end were maxi coats and dresses. Designer labels started to appear on the outside of the garments to make a style statement.

After the success of Coronation Street on the television other ‘soaps’ starting with Crossroads that was based in the Midlands and then Emmerdale Farm from the Yorkshire Dales. Children’s programmes featured Rainbow and Bagpuss. Adults enjoyed On the Buses, Kojak and The New Avengers.

Jaws the Movie


Better, more realistic films were released and caused people to return to the cinema after the decline in the 1960’s. There was Dirty Harry played by Clint Eastwood, The Godfather with Marlon Brando, The Last Tango in Paris and Cabaret starred Liza Minelli and Steven Spielberg’s film Jaws with it’s gripping music all played a part. John Travolta starred in Saturday Night Fever and Grease and Star Wars won seven Academy Awards including one for visual effects.

Oh, and don’t forget that wonderful summer of 76′. Water shortage, hose pipe bans, and everyone flocking around the Ice Cream Van when they came round !Fab Lolly

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1970’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in 1970’s Britain, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this wonderful decade. Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.

What was life like in 1960’s Britain ?

What was life like in 1960’s Britain ?

The Beatles Help Album
The 1960’s was a decade of great social change. Music set the pace and songs from The Beatles, Rolling Stones, Kinks and Dusty Springfield led the youth culture. Find out more on what life was like in 1960’s Britain below :

Challenges to authority were made by programmes on the television such as ‘That was the week that was’ with David Frost and Lance Percival. Rock musicals such as ‘Hair’ and ‘Oh Calcutta’ with it’s nude scenes were pushing the limits.

By the end of the decade most families had televisions and live Trans-Atlantic broadcasts were made possible by the Telstar satellite. Science Fiction puppets in Captain Scarlet and Thunderbirds thrilled youngsters and Doctor Who and the Daleks was ‘real’ enough to scare many young viewers. BBC2 was launched in 1964 and in 1967 was the first channel to have colour.

Fashion was influenced by Jean Shrimpton and Mary Quant, mini skirts was very popular as well as florescent and bright geometrical patterns.

By the end of the decade ‘Flower Power’ manifested itself in everything from pyschedelic fabrics to peaceful rebellion and even hallucinogenic drugs.

The 1960’s had memorable headlines such as the death in 1965 of Winston Churchill, the Great Train Robbery of 1963 shocked the nation. The assassination of President Kennedy rocked the World.

The 1969 Moon Landing


There were a string of achievements in the space race with Russia sending the first man into space and then three weeks later the USA’s Alan Shepard went up. John Glen and Scott Carpenter orbited the Earth in 1962. The first space walks were made in 1965 and after more missions the greatest achievement of the decade was the Moon Walk by the Americans Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin in 1969.

Supermarket shelves were filled with branded goods, frozen and chilled items such as desserts and yoghurts. Most homes by this decade had refrigerators to store their shopping for longer. So the weekly shop came into being !

The 1960’s was the time of the ‘MOD’s’ and ‘Rockers’ who were two social groups of opposing cultures.

The Mod’s were style-concious and wore light suits and polo neck shirts and rode Italian Scooters such as the Lambretta and Mods in the 1960'sVespa. The Rockers wore leather jackets and rode high octane motorbike os the day. Seaside town became the battle-fields with stand offs between the opposing groups.

Employment was high and most people had a reasonable income so consumerism increased. Holidays abroad became popular and many mor people owned their own cars. The Austin and Morris Mini cars endorsed by Peter Sellers, Lord Snowden and Twiggy. Paddy Hopkirk won the Monte Carlo Rally in 1964 in a Mini Cooper and sales accelerated.

Televison entertained the children with puppet shows such as Camberwick Green, Trumpton and Magic Roundabout. Older children found Doctor Who compulsive viewing. Comics were very popular with The Hornet, Jena and Twinkle just a few of many.

Barbie was a teenage doll that had endless clothes and accessories. Action Man came to the UK in 1966 and for many years was the most popular toy for boys. Space Hoppers were new outdoor plaything and brought great fun to children (and Adults !)

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1960’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in 1960’s Britain, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this wonderful decade. Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.

What was life like in 1950’s Britain ?

What was life like in 1950’s Britain ?

In 1951 the Festival of Britain, which was an exhibition to celebrate industry, arts and science, lifted the country by showing the successful recovery from the devastation of war. Rationing restrictions were gradually eased and by 1954 all rationing came to an end. Read more below on what life was like in 1950’s Britain :

King George VI died unexpectedly the following year but although he was much loved it was felt that a new era was beginning and the coronation of Queen Elizabeth, in 1953. was seen to mark the start of a new way of life. Over 100,000 television sets were sold to watch the event and soon became the focus of family entertainment. Children watched puppets such as Muffin the Mule and Sooty; adults watched sporting events such as Stanley Matthews winning his first FA cup medal when Blackpool beat Bolton Wanderers 4-3. In the same year Len Hutton and Denis Compton helped to win the Ashes from Australia at the Oval.

When the Independent television channel was launched in 1955 ‘adverts’ were slotted in between programmes. Tea bags, coffee, sugar coated cereals and washing powder that made whites whiter were all promoted, as were electric washing machines and refrigerators. Plastic in bright colours became widely available and lightweight buckets, washing up bowls, mops and brushes brightened up the homes. Formica, encouraged by the emphasis on hygiene, was ideal for kitchen surfaces as it was easy to wipe and keep clean. Housewives were encouraged to take pride in their homes and Do-it -Yourself became popular but power drills like the Black and Decker and Wolf were for the men. Furnishings were influenced by a new modular system by G-plan which was assembled piece by piece to individual room arrangements.

Self service shops started a new experience for shoppers who selected their goods and they paid on the way out, an assistant put the goods into the customer’s own basket and gave a receipt. Bolder, brighter designs were now needed to attract the customers. Supermarkets were introduced at the end of the decade and a new aggressive style of marketing was introduced from America with money-off coupons and price reductions promoted alongside the television advertising.

Man-made fibres allowed fabrics to be made with permanent pleats, shirts and blouses were made of polyester so that they were drip-dry and minimum-iron. Shirt style dresses with generous skirts were worn in the day while pencil skirts and fitted suits were worn in town. Fashions for young men included the Teddy boy long velvet jacket with drainpipe trousers and bootlace tie.

 

 

Successful television shows based on popular music coincided with the arrival of rock’n’roll. ..The new music was highlighted in the Top Ten charts which started in 1955; Elvis Presley entered the British charts in 1956. Hits started coming from British stars like Tommy Steele, Cliff Richard, Adam Faith and Billy Fury.

Harold Macmillan said in his1957 election campaign that Britain had ‘never had it so good ‘ although some did not agree and the first campaign for nuclear disarmament (CND) took place in 1958.

 

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1950’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in 1950’s Britain, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this wonderful decade. Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.

What was life like in Wartime Britain and the 1940’s ?

What was life like in Wartime Britain and the 1940’s

How to survive rationing during World War Two

The outbreak of war created new values and attitudes, a feeling that everyone should do their bit towards the war effort. ‘Digging for victory’ and ‘Make do and Mend‘ as well as ‘Keep smiling’ and ‘Keep calm and carry on’ became popular phrases and encouraged the community spirit. Read more below to discover what life was like in Wartime Britain and the 1940’s :

In 1939 children were being evacuated from the major cities. Gas masks were given out and everyone was encouraged to carry them at all times. Food rationing soon came in and bacon, butter , sugar and meat were issued on a points system quickly followed by tea, with ration books issued to everyone. Leaflets and booklets were printed by the Ministry of Food to help to make the most of the limited food that was available. Posters were produced to identify aircraft and ships to make the public aware of the enemy.

Women filled in the gaps left by the men who had gone to fight, as they had done during the First World War.They became munition workers, post women, conductors as well as joining the Land Army, the WRNS, WAAF and ATS.

Replica prints from World War Two – The Blitz

Newspapers headlined the major events such as the Blitz, Dunkirk, The Dambusters and of course Victory in Europe. Cinemas showed movies that boosted morale and the radio became the focus for the latest news and family entertainment. Popular songs captured the mood and morale boosters such as Lilli Marlene kept the spirits up.

Clothes were rationed from June 1941, coupons were needed for new clothes and the emphasis was on making do. Sweets were rationed to three ounces a week from July 1942. Everything was in short supply particularly saucepans, toothbrushes and soap. Families were encouraged to economise on fuel and electricity, to use no more than five inches of hot water in the bath and to switch off unnecessary lights .

The war in Europe came to an end on 8th May 1945 and Japan finally surrendered on 14th August.

1940’s Post War

In 1946 there was a rapid change in industry from wartime to peacetime production but most of the products were for export as the country needed to get back on its feet after the huge costs of the war. There was a chronic shortage of housing as many homes had been destroyed during the bombing raids and there was also an influx of servicemen who had recently been demobilised and needed accommodation. Prefabricated homes were a temporary solution and council house building started in earnest with new estates springing up. The Labour government set out plans to nationalise coal, gas and electricity industries, railways, roads and ports. The railways were actually nationalised in 1949.

Although the war was over rationing was as bad as ever, and bread, which had not been rationed during the war, was rationed for two years because of a world shortage of grain.

The Reverand W Awdry’s book Thomas the Tank Engine was launched as was Enid Blytons Famous Five series and Rupert the Bear continued to be printed.

The New Look’ by Dior revolutionised the fashion industry although the extravagant use of material was beyond most people as material was still rationed.

More people now took paid annual leave and Butlin’s and Pontin’s holiday camps proved popular although guests were reminded to take their ration books.

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1940’s and World War Two Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in was like in Wartime Britain and the 1940’s, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this influential decade. Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.

What was life like in 1930’s Britain ?

What was life like in 1930’s Britain ?

1930's Scrapbook

1930’s Scrapbook, relive the lifestyles and fashions for this 20th century decade.

Britain was still recovering from the ravages of World War One and in 1932 over three million were unemployed. Oswald Mosley’s fascists group was formed and started causing trouble in London with marches and demonstrations. The jobless of Jarrow marched to the city in 1936 to highlight the desperate situation in the north of the country. Despite all the gloom there was plenty to be cheerful about. Read on further to discover what life was like in 1930’s Britain :

The cinema was showing ‘talkies’ and Shirley Temple was a top box office attraction in 1935. For children there were Mickey Mouse and Popeye and the first feature length cartoon, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, was shown in 1937. Monopoly could be found in many homes in 1936 when it rivalled the word game Lexicon. Dinky cars became popular with young children. A new wave of chocolate bars became available, Mars, Aero, Kit Kat, Milky Way and Milky Bar were in the shops at 2d (1p) a bar. There was a steadily improving selection of labour saving appliances for the home. Hoover brought out an upright vacuum cleaner which boasted a novel dust seeking light. The Ewbank table mangle aimed at making wash day easier by squeezing the water out of the clothes instead of wringing them out by hand.

 

Sunlight Soap

An increased awareness of health and hygiene coincided with an increased standard of living and more people could afford soap and toothpaste. Sunlight soap, Lux and Palmolive were very popular as was Gibbs Dentifrice, Colgate and Pepsodent toothpaste.

Still bringing a sparkle to homes were Windolene (1922), Duraglit (1927) and Brillo (1928) with new products such as Dreft washing powder competing with Rinso which had been on the market since 1910.

Breakfast cereals such as Kelloggs Cornflakes, Rice Krispies, Quaker Oats and Shredded Wheat were in huge demand and by the end of 1930’s the American companies had established factories in Britain.

Many of the major cigarette brands promoted their products by putting cards in the packets which were collected by children, topics included footballers, sporting celebrities, royalty, birds and flowers. Popular brands of cigarettes were Players Please, Senior Service, Wills Woodbines and Black Cat Cigarettes.

Most homes had a radio by the end of the 1930’s and the BBC provided a programme of drama, news , religion, Childrens hour and music. For those who could afford a holiday the seaside beckoned and holiday camps were dotted all around the coast.

Butlins Holiday Camps

 

 

 

Butlins Skegness was opened in 1936 followed by Clacton- on- Sea in 1938, each chalet had its own cold running water and electricity, entertainment was provided in all weathers.

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1930’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in was like in in 1930’s Britain, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this influential decade. Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.

What was life like in 1920’s Britain ?

What was life like in 1920’s Britain ?

The Roaring Twenties Memorabilia Pack

World War 1 had caused high unemployment especially for young men, many of whom had been injured or were suffering from shell shock, but the 1920’s was also a time full of change and invention. Read on to discover what life was like in 1920’s Britain :

Rambling and cycling were popular pastimes and with motoring more affordable the leisure industry boomed. The first commercial flights began in 1919, then in 1924 Imperial Airways, with the British government’s help, offered flights to the major European cities. Petrol stations had been introduced in 1920 as Britain’s roads were filling up with cars and commercial vehicles. Privately run railways were restructured to form four companies, LNER, LMS, GWR and Southern in an attempt to recover lost business in the fields of holiday travel and freight. The only way to cross oceans however was by ship and the great liners took five days to travel from Southampton to New York.

Max Factor Cosmetics

Fashions for women changed radically, hemlines rose to reveal more and more leg, close fitting cloche hats became popular and the emancipated women cut their hair short and smoked cigarettes in public. Fashions for men and women became simpler which led to clothes becoming more affordable. Cosmetics were more widely used and those going to parties or dances wore mascara, rouge and lipstick. Max Factor, Elizabeth Arden and Helena Rubenstein became the leading brands.
The electric kettle, toaster, refrigerator, cooker, iron and suction cleaner were all appliances that the modern housewife dreamed of owning.

The choice of sweets grew substantially with Cadbury’s launching the chocolate Flake and Fruit and Nut bars,. Fry’s Crunchie came on the market in 1929, but chocolate was still a luxury. Toffee was still very much in demand and was produced by hundreds of small companies across the country.

1920's Scrapbook

 

 

Many people visited the cinema on a weekly basis and the screen stars were known by millions. The radio began to provide daily entertainment and on 14th November 1922 the British Broadcasting company started transmitting news and concerts from 6pm until 10pm. This new novelty caused great excitement and within a year there were 500,000 licensed receivers. The annual licence cost ten shillings.

Many toys and games tended to reflect everyday life and train sets,clockwork cars and Meccanno sets were the favourite toys for boys. Dolls were popular with girls and were becoming more lifelike.

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of 1920’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like in was like in in 1920’s Britain, our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this influential decade

What was life like during World War One and 1910’s Britain ?

What was life like during World War One and 1910’s Britain ?

King George V Coin

King George V was the second son of King Edward VII, his elder brother Prince Albert had died during an outbreak of influenza at the age of 28. George married Princess Mary of Teck who had previously been engaged to his brother Albert. They had five sons and a daughter and were married for 42 years. Find out more what life was like during World War One and 1910’s Britain below :

The early years of his reign were full of unrest. Workers in Liverpool were striking and the army had to be called in to quell the riots. The Suffragette movement was becoming increasingly violent. Ireland was also in uproar as the demand for home rule intensified. In 1912 a major disaster occurred when the ‘unsinkable’ ocean liner the Titanic hit an iceberg on her maiden voyage and sank; 1,513 passengers and crew died.

World War One Newspaper

In 1914 the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand in Sarajevo escalated into ‘the war to end all wars’. With the outbreak of World War 1 a wave of patriotism swept the country and many young men rushed to enlist not to miss the experience. The popular belief was that it would all be over by Christmas. Lord Kitchener, who was the Secretary of State for War, initially called for 100,000 men and his famous poster, Britons Kitchener wants You, was used in his recruitment campaign. Women also backed the war effort and showed their ability to do much of the work previously done by men. Public respect for King George increased when he made many visits to hospitals, the front line, factories and dockyards. In 1917 anti german feeling made the king replace the family name from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor.

In 1918 the Representation of the People act gave women, over the age of 30, the right to vote. It was ten years later before all women over the age of 21 could vote. In 1931 the economic slump caused a political crisis in Britain and the king called for a coalition government which was eventually formed.

King George celebrated his Silver Jubilee in 1935 and he died in January 1936.

Here at Sweet and Nostalgic we have a great range of World War One and 1910’s Gift Ideas. Come and have a look at what life was like during World War One and 1910’s Britain , our products give you a warm nostalgic flavour for this wonderful decade Our range covers the whole of the 20th Century, so there’s something on our site for everyone interested in the most influential century that the world has known to date.